Who Dat? – S

While you’re awaiting tonight’s final presidential debate, what better way to spend the time than by solving the identities of these “S” buttons?

As our fellow political junkies know, for some time now we’ve been showing photos of unknown buttons, arranged alphabetically by candidate names, for you to help identify.  We can’t make heads or tails of these candidates, most of whom we’ve never heard of.  And when we see a “Smith for Congress” or a “Jones for Senator” button, how do we know which Smith or which Jones?  So we’ve been posting pictures of these buttons, hoping you will have the answer.  Often, you have come through, which is most appreciated.

Thus far, we’ve completed the first 17 letters of the alphabet.  (Check out our previous “Who Dats”:  Unknowns beginning with the Letter A, Letter B, two pages for Letter C (here and here), Letter D, Letter E, Letter F, Letter G, Letter H, Letter I, Letter J, Letter K, Letter L, Letter M, Letter N,  Letter O, Letter P and Letter R.)  Let the record show we don’t have enough unknown Q candidates to list.  We even have one of buttons with pictures only — no names.  That’s even harder to decipher.

We now bring you to the Letter S.  Any idea on who these S candidates R?  Thanks!

18 thoughts on “Who Dat? – S”

  1. George Sacco – Mass. State Rep. (1963-74), finished second to Frank Bellotti in the Democratic primary for Atty. General, 1974.

    Reply
  2. “Howard W. Smith for senator” — 1946. Virginia. After Carter Glass died, there was a special election to fill his Class 2 senate seat, with nominees picked by party conventions. Congressman Howard W. Smith was an unsuccessful candidate at the state Democratic convention. (This was several years before he became chairman of the House Rules Committee.)

    Reply
  3. “Win with Staud” – I have one of those. Staud was elected Rochester (N.Y.) alderman in 1907, defeated for re-election in 1909, and was the unsuccessful Democratic-Progressive nominee for mayor of Rochester in 1913.

    Reply
  4. “Marty Snyder for Congress” — Snyder was General Eisenhower’s mess sergeant during WWII. In 1954 he ran an unsuccessful write-in campaign for the GOP congressional nomination in New York 20 (the district FDR Jr. vacated to run for Governor). See “Marty Snyder Loses,” NYT, 9/2/54, p. 31; “Final Results of City Primary,” NYT, 9/16/54, p. 22.

    Reply
  5. “Stacey for Governor” — probably J. Harold Stacey, speaker of the Vermont House in 1949; candidate for governor in the 1950 GOP primary.

    Reply
  6. “Vote Newk Steuart” — H. Newcomb “Newk” Steuart, Jr. (R), elected City Councilman at large in Syracuse, NY in 1959 and 1963, retiring in 1967.

    Reply
  7. Ernest “Jack” Stockum announced his candidacy in 1981 for Ohio 17, John Ashbrook’s congressional seat. (Mansfield News-Journal, 7/23/81.) But with Ashbrook running for the Senate in 1982, the seat was a casualty of redistricting. After Ashbrook died in 1982, Stockum announced his candidacy again, but never filed his peitions. So Ashbrook’s widow Jean won the GOP nomination without a primary. (Coshocton Tribune, 6/2/82.)

    Reply
  8. “Make it Shine!” — Bruce Shine, a former DNC member, ran for Governor of Tennessee in 1994, but withdrew before the primary. (See “Shine out of race, pulls for Bredesen,” Nashville Tennessean, 5/27/94.)

    Reply
  9. Robert L. Stevens D-NJ 4th 1904 lost; Frank A. Sarstadt R-OH Cuyahoga Co. 1904 lost; Albert K. Spencer R-OH Cuyahoga Co. 1904, ’06 won both; Charles H. Schadt D-PA Lackawanna Co. 1897, ’00 won both; Barney J. Schwarzer D-OH Cuyahoga Co. 1908 lost; Francis X. Schwab R-NY Buffalo 1921, ’25, ’29 won, won, lost; Jacob G. Slonaker D-PA treasurer Adams Co. 1908 won

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Item added to cart.
0 items - $0.00